Neoliberal Tools (and Archives): A Political History of Digital Humanities By Daniel Allington, Sarah Brouillette, David Golumbia

Another very interesting article with focuses on a more problematic side of Digital Humanities. In a way it builds up on Richard Grusin‘s argument which I have mentioned before.

For me, the two most important things in the article are: the role how DH plays into current trends in the higher education in USA and Canada, and secondly that it focuses on the literary studies. My impression is that DH is especially suitable for this particular field and is most present in it and thus most papers on DH talk about the literary studies. Which leads to my previous reservation: why do we talk about DH if it is so intimately tied to specific academic fields?

Daniel Allington, Sarah Brouillette, David Columbia, Neoliberal Tools (and Archives): A Political History of Digital Humanities, Los Angeles Review of Books (MAY 1, 2016)

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